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What are the LED lights?

A light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source. It is a p–n junction diode that emits light when activated. When a suitable current is applied to the leads, electrons are able to recombine with electron holes within the device, releasing energy in the form of photons.

 

Do LED light bulbs get hot?

You probably know that LED bulbs run dramatically cooler than their incandescent cousins, but that doesn't mean they don't produce heat. LED bulbs do get hot, but the heat is pulled away by a heat sink in the base of the bulb.

LED Lighting

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FIVE THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE CHOOSING LEDS LIGHTING

As your incandescents burn out, it's a good time to consider switching to LED bulbs. LEDs have an impressive lifespan (20-something years!) and are very cost-effective.

Now's the right time to switch to LEDs. These bulbs have made significant advances over the last few years, finally delivering the warm light incandescents have comforted us with for decades. Because there are so many LED varieties, choosing an LED is entirely different from picking up an incandescent. Here is what you need to know when choosing the right LED bulbs for your new tiled or solid conservatory roof project.

Forget what you know about incandescents -- Lumens, not watts.

 

When shopping for bulbs, you're probably accustomed to looking for watts, an indication of how bright the bulb will be. The brightness of LEDs, however, is determined a little differently.

 

Contrary to common belief, wattage isn't an indication of brightness, but a measurement of how much energy the bulb draws. For incandescents, there is an accepted correlation between the watts drawn and the brightness, but for LEDs, watts aren't a great predictor of how bright the bulb will be. (The point, after all, is that they draw less energy.)

 

For example, an LED bulb with comparable brightness to a 60W incandescent is only 8 to 12 watts. But don't bother doing the maths -- there isn't a uniform way to covert incandescent watts to LED watts. Instead, a different form of measurement should be used: lumens. The lumen (lm) is the real measurement of brightness provided by a light bulb, and is the number you should look for when shopping for LEDs. For reference, here's a chart that shows the watt-lumen conversion for incandescents and LEDs.

 

Choosing the right color LED

 

You can always count on incandescents providing a warm, yellowish hue. But LEDs come in a wide range of colors.

 

As shown off by the Philips Hue, LED bulbs are capable of displaying an impressive color range, from purple to red, to a spectrum of whites and yellows. For the home, however, you're likely looking for something similar to the light that incandescents produce.

 

The popular colors available for LEDs are "warm white" or "soft white," and "bright white."

 

Warm white and soft white will produce a yellow hue, close to incandescents, while bulbs labeled as bright white will produce a whiter light, closer to daylight and similar to what you see in retail stores.

 

If you want to get technical, light color (color temperature) is measured in kelvins. The lower the number, the warmer (yellower) the light. So, your typical incandescent is somewhere between 2,700 and 3,500K. If that's the color you're going for, look for this range while shopping for LED bulbs.

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